Posts tagged: software

Upgrade to Windows 10?

Microsoft has cleverly delivered pop-up invitations for free upgrades to Windows 10.  Should you take advantage and become an early adopter?  In my usual pragmatic manner, I advise against it unless you want to unwittingly become an early debugger too.

Let the big firms with in-house tech support go through the pain first.  They can afford to smooth all the wrinkles and support users through the bumpy ride.  Wait until at least the first service pack comes out.  And following that, the software gets “good reports” regarding the results of the service pack installation.  Then and only then should you install.

My colleague, Jennifer Ellis, is much more analytical in her approach.  In her blog postShould You Upgrade to Windows 10?” she spells out the specific considerations to take into account for each end-user and firm.  Give it a read, to help you decide.

As always, I will post to the blog when I think the time has arrived to safely install Windows 10 for the majority of users who read my blog.  If you go back into my historical archives of past blog posts, you’ll see that I never recommended installation of Windows Vista.  As time passed it became apparent that it was never going to be a decent operating system.  I suggested keeping XP going until the next generation (Windows 7) was released, and upgraded at least once.  It turned out to be the right move.  I also recommended the same with Windows 8.  So stay tuned.  I won’t steer you wrong.

 

Custom Apps Created by Law Firms – Brilliant Marketing

A terrific next step in education-based marketing strategy is the law firm mobile device app, designed to address a specific client need.  Law Technology News recently reported on  apps designed by Latham & Watkins and O’Melveny & Myers, to inform users about anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws.

The Latham & Watkins iPhone and iPad app, which is called the AB&C  Laws Application, was launched on  July 18th.  It is free from Apple Inc.’s iTunes app store. The app serves as a reference tool informing users about anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws  in major jurisdictions around the world. In November, 2012,  O’Melveny & Myers released a similar app with a more narrow scope, which focuses exclusively on the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practice Act (FCPA).  The app can be downloaded free from  Apple Inc.’s iTunes app store. (search: “OMM FCPA”), and is designed for use on the iPhone® and iPad® devices. According to a firm spokesperson, the app has been downloaded 550 times since it  was launched.

More firms are jumping on board to develop apps.  Fox Rothschild launched its New Jersey Divorce app in June 2013, after taking six months to build it.

I completely agree with legal marketing guru Micah Buchdahl, owner of marketing company HTMLawyers, who is quoted saying, “there are more law firm apps on the market than people may realize. But that  doesn’t mean they are all effective. . . . The reality is that most of these apps that the law firms have developed have  very small usage and really it’s just about saying that you have one . . . If a firm does create an app, the best bet is to be practice-area specific . . . the apps have come down in price and can cost between $5,000 and $25,000 to  create, depending on the app’s sophistication.”

I didn’t say this was a cheap strategy.  I said it was a smart one.

Most firms don’t have the internal resources to develop an app.  Latham & Watkins and O’Melveny & Myers had the talent on staff.  I’m not sure whether Fox Rothschild did their own design work on the app, but suspect they did.  When West Virginia-based Spilman Thomas & Battle, which has an office in  Pittsburgh, decided to develop a human-resources-focused app, they turned to  Pittsburgh-based Quest Fore for assistance.  They launched their app, SuperVision in early July, 2013.

There is no doubt that we’re just scratching the surface of the development of law firm apps which are actually useful to clients, rather than being a glorified advertisement for the firm.  Right now this is a strategy which requires a significant investment of time and dollars.  Given increased demand by law firms,  I anticipate that tools will be developed which will make app development an affordable strategy for smaller firms.

 

Document Assembly – Work Smarter Instead of Harder

Repetitive documents are most cost-effectively produced using document assembly software.  I recall reading that approximately 80% of legal documents are mostly repetitive; using boilerplate language.  They provide opportunity to gain efficiency in production by working smart.

Document assembly software provides a user with the ability to create an “interview” or “standard information” form.  It then merges the information into a document.  While one can actually create quite intelligent merges using the native capabilities of Word or WordPerfect, it requires extensive training and skill to actually go beyond a simple merge, e.g. to include if/then logic in the merge.  Using document assembly makes it easier to do advanced work with less training.

Document assembly also makes it easier to ensure consistent collection of data through use of the interview form.  Think of it as your checklist to make sure all the essential information required to produce the document is collected each time.  Use of the interview form also allows for clients to input information directly, with the resulting document draft being delivered to the attorney for review and any additional required customization.

HotDocs is one of the first real document assembly programs to be introduced to the legal community.  According to the HotDocs website, their software is “the platform of choice for 35% of the US document-generation legal market.”  That’s impressive, given that there are some excellent competitors out there, such as DealBuilder, Ghostfill, Pathagoras, and one of my favorites, The FormTool, to name but a few.

HotDocs continues to retain its lead over other programs because most early adopters have continued to use it over the years, in order to preserve the investment of their intellectual capital.  Those who adopted document assembly later, were more inclined to use some of the other, newer programs.  Many are deemed easier to use, based on the feedback I receive from lawyers.  However, it should be said that HotDocs is still a solid program.  For firms which have been users, they will be glad to know that HotDocs now offers cloud-based document generation.  Pricing has yet to be announced.

If you routinely produce documents which lend themselves to automation, such as  wills, loans, interrogatories, leases, and so forth, you would be wise to investigate the excellent choices of software available, which are designed specifically for law firm use.  Remember, you can’t work harder.  You need to work smarter.  Document assembly software is all about helping you work smarter.

Simple Timeline Software

Sometimes you need to create a simple Timeline, but you don’t do it often enough to justify buying expensive application software.  What do you do?

We’re all probably familiar with TimeMap, now owned by LexisNexis.  It was probably the first really good and easy-to-use software designed specifically for this purpose.  It’s become a favorite of trial attorneys and paralegals.  There are always specials at trade shows, like ABA TechShow, and I grabbed it for $99 a number of years ago.

If you don’t do a lot of timelines, or don’t get to the shows, how can you produce a decent Timeline without spending the bucks?  Simple.  You already have tools to do it.  Here are instructions on how to create a Timeline using Excel.  Here are instructions to create a Timeline using the SmartArt graphics feature in PowerPoint.  There’s even free shareware called Timeline, which is a cross-platform application.

All three tips are courtesy of attorney Paula Gibson, on ABA’s LawTech listserv.  Thank you Paula!

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