Job Opening / Opportunity – Associate Attorney

Job Opening / Opportunity in Williamsport, PA:

McCormick Law Firm in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, is looking to hire a full-time associate attorney with 1-7 years experience who is interested in working in the general practice of law, with a focus in Professional Liability Defense and Commercial Litigation. The associate will also have opportunities to work in the following practice areas: General Defense Litigation, Municipal Law, and/or Labor & Employment Law. The ideal candidate must be focused, highly motivated, and energized to take on current business as well as new challenges. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Founded in 1862, McCormick Law Firm is one of the oldest and most established law firms in North Central Pennsylvania. The Firm has a regional presence, and is looking for an attorney with a long-term commitment to residing and practicing in Pennsylvania. The Williamsport area offers a high quality of life. All attorneys at McCormick Law Firm are encouraged and expected to be involved as a volunteer in the community.

Interested applicants should send a resume, law school transcript and cover letter, including available start date, to Emilie Pearson, Business Manager, via email, or via regular mail to:

McCormick Law Firm
Attn: Emilie Pearson, Business Manager
835 West Fourth Street
Williamsport, PA 17701

Job Opportunity — Office Manager / Paralegal / Assistant

A growing solo practice PI firm in Conshohocken, PA is looking for someone who can do it all.  A great job opportunity!  The ideal candidate will have:

  • three or more years’ experience in a plaintiffs personal injury law firm
  • experience managing a small office
  • well-developed communication skills
  • experience with cloud-based or traditional practice management computer software — Clio experience a plus
  • experience with motor vehicle cases, premises cases, and medical malpractice is important

The position is part-time, with an anticipated transition to full time.  The firm offers a flexible and family-friendly workplace.

Please send your resume and salary expectations to  Andrew T. Neuwirth, Esquire.   Not accepting submissions from recruiters, or by telephone.

Job Opening / Opportunity – Paralegal

Heckscher, Teillon, Terrill & Sager, is a boutique trusts and estates law firm with 17 attorneys and 6 paralegals located 20 minutes from Center City Philadelphia in West Conshohocken.  They have a job opening / opportunity for an experienced, full-time trusts and estates paralegal.

Qualified Candidate Requirements:

  • Minimum of 4 years trusts and estates experience, including administration of complex estates and trusts, and preparation of Federal and State tax returns (706, PA-1500, 1041, PA-41)
  • 4-year degree or paralegal certificate, or equivalent experience
  • Professional manor, ability to work independently in a fast paced, high pressure environment.
  • Team player, yet independent thinker.
  • Excellent communication, writing and organizational skills. Able to prioritize, multi-task, and work well with clients. Exceptional attention to detail.
  • Experience with tax preparation software (knowledge of Faster and/or ProSystems Fx Tax a plus).
  • Office 2010 (Word, Excel, Outlook) experience required.

The position offers competitive salary and generous benefits.

Qualified candidates may email cover letter, resume, salary requirements and references in confidence to: Anne L. Paisley, Firm Administrator.

The firm is not accepting telephone calls regarding the position.

Why You Need a Real Lawyer -4

 

Beware!!  Before you replace a lawyer with an internet-based “legal service” provider, consider that the results can be disastrous. What they do is provide quick forms for legal needs.  They advertise their availability on television.  They provide forms for business formation, wills, divorce, Powers of Attorney, estate plans, and more.  In the story related below, the forms were for franchises.

No doubt you’ve heard or read that Bar Associations in most states have sued most of these providers for something called the Unauthorized Practice of Law.   Unless you are a lawyer or employed in the legal field, you probably felt they were the underdog. You may have rooted for them to win.  And indeed, they are very careful in interpreting the UPL statute in each state to ensure they do not cross the line. They cannot legally provide any advice. They can only provide a form.  So they survive all challenges.  At least so far.

Their advertising portrays them as the hero trying to save the average person’s hard-earned dollars from seemingly greedy lawyers.  And frankly, Ed the entrepreneur is eating it up big time.  Use of these internet-based services is growing.

The problem is that Mike the carpenter doesn’t know when the matter requires greater finesse than these forms can provide.  And when an undesirable outcome finally shows up — often years later — it often can’t be fixed, or costs far more to fix than would have been spent originally to do it right.

Here’s the problem.  There’s no way to know in advance if the solution is inadequate, unless an actual lawyer is involved.  Later, when a lawyer must correct, or attempt to correct, the situation, he or she is bound by confidentiality and cannot reveal to the public the consequences of using such services.  So unfortunately Mike the carpenter shares all the success stories with friends and relatives, and enhances the reputation of these services.  Rarely does Mike the carpenter hear of the horror stories from others.  And those who ultimately must use a real lawyer to fix problems after the fact rarely talk about it.

So I have challenged lawyers to share some of those stories with me, without any client-identifiable information.  I will in turn publish the information.  Share it with friends, relatives and colleagues who are tempted to meet their legal needs “on the cheap” with an online service provider.

All the stories will be posted under the same title “Why You Need a Real Lawyer” so if you don’t want to subscribe, just return to the blog on occasion and look for that title in the Table of Contents.

Story #4:

A client came to me to review  a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD ) and franchise agreement template he had purchased on the Internet and filled out so he could start selling franchises. Upon review of the proposed document, it was clear that it was fraught with issues, not the least of which was that it was quite misleading and filled with misrepresentations.

 

This was not because the client was trying to mislead or misrepresent anyone in their responses, but because the client did not have anyone to explain to him what information each disclosure was required to contain and what information it should not contain.

 

The FDD is a very regulated, highly complex document that the average person, even most attorneys, would not know how to properly complete. In addition to the potential fraud and misrepresentation claims that could be brought against the client if he used that form, the form, as completed by the client, violated federal and many state’s laws on franchising.

 

Use of that form could have been extremely costly in penalties and fines by federal and state authorities, and would have allowed each franchisee of the client to rescind the franchise agreement for failure to comply with the federal and state laws.

 

The document was a total waste of money by the client and had to be discarded.  We had to prepare a totally new document.  This cost the client money and time he spent on the template, and then the cost and time of drafting the documents from scratch with us.

How Quickly Do You Follow Up on Prospect Calls?

Time is of the essence when you are contacted by a prospective client. How can you improve your response time to the prospect?  Law firm marketing guru Stephen Fairley recently wrote

A study on the lifespan of sales leads conducted by the Harvard Business Review found that leads contacted within one hour are 7 times more likely to be converted than if the contact was two hours later – and 60 times more likely to be converted than if the contact was 24 hours later.

He offers valuable advice on how to improve your response rate.  Spoiler alert: effective use of your existing technology is involved!

Job Opening – Associate Attorney

Cipriani & Werner PC is a regional law firm with offices in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New Jersey and Delaware. They are currently searching for a full time associate attorney with 4-6 years of litigation experience to work in their Blue Bell, PA office. Strongest candidates will have extensive experience defending clients through all phases of the litigation process.  Experience taking depositions is a must. The firm offers a generous benefits package including medical, dental, life and LTD as well as a matching 401(k) plan. Salary is negotiable. Please submit your resume along with salary requirements to Denise L. Barbadoro, Office Manager.

Why You Need a Real Lawyer -3

Beware!!  Before you replace a lawyer with an internet-based “legal service” provider, consider that the results can be disastrous. What they do is provide quick forms for legal needs.  They advertise their availability on television.  They provide forms for business formation, wills, divorce, Powers of Attorney, estate plans, and more.

No doubt you’ve heard or read that Bar Associations in most states have sued most of these providers for something called the Unauthorized Practice of Law.   Unless you are a lawyer or employed in the legal field, you probably felt they were the underdog. You may have rooted for them to win.  And indeed, they are very careful in interpreting the UPL statute in each state to ensure they do not cross the line. They cannot legally provide any advice. They can only provide a form.  So they survive all challenges.  At least so far.

Their advertising portrays them as the hero trying to save the average person’s hard-earned dollars from seemingly greedy lawyers.  And frankly, Ed the entrepreneur is eating it up big time.  Use of these internet-based services is growing.

The problem is that Ed the entrepreneur doesn’t know when the matter requires greater finesse than these forms can provide.  And when an undesirable outcome finally shows up — often years later — it often can’t be fixed, or costs far more to fix than would have been spent originally to do it right.

Here’s the problem.  There’s no way to know in advance if the solution is inadequate, unless an actual lawyer is involved.  Later, when a lawyer must correct, or attempt to correct, the situation, he or she is bound by confidentiality and cannot reveal to the public the consequences of using such services.  So unfortunately Ed the entrepreneur shares all the success stories with friends and relatives, and enhances the reputation of these services.  Rarely does Ed the entrepreneur hear of the horror stories from others.  And those who ultimately must use a real lawyer to fix problems after the fact rarely talk about it.

So I have challenged lawyers to share some of those stories with me, without any client-identifiable information.  I will in turn publish the information.  Share it with friends, relatives and colleagues who are tempted to meet their legal needs “on the cheap” with an online service provider.

All the stories will be posted under the same title “Why You Need a Real Lawyer” so if you don’t want to subscribe, just return to the blog on occasion and look for that title in the Table of Contents.

Story #3:

Child is taking care of ill parent. Parent wants to change will to give caretaker child a larger share of the estate than the other siblings. (The other parent is already deceased). Caretaker hires “notario publico” to draft new will. This non-lawyer charges almost the same rate that local lawyers would have charged. When the ill parent passes, the caretaker child submits the new will for probate. Siblings challenge the new will, and present the old will. Child caretaker isn’t clear with [real lawyer] handling the will challenge on her behalf, that the new will was prepared by someone not licensed to practice law. [Real lawyer] makes best effort, but can’t overcome the problems with the flawed new will. Siblings win.

Why You Need a Real Lawyer -2

Before you replace a lawyer with an internet-based “legal service” provider, think carefully. What they do is provide quick forms for legal needs.  They advertise their availability on television.  They provide forms for business formation, wills, Powers of Attorney, estate plans, and more.  Beware!!  The results can be disastrous.

No doubt you’ve heard or read that Bar Associations in most states have sued most of these providers for something called the Unauthorized Practice of Law.   Unless you are a lawyer or employed in the legal field, you probably felt they were the underdog. You may have rooted for them to win.  And indeed, they are very careful in interpreting the UPL statute in each state to ensure they do not cross the line. They cannot legally provide any advice. They can only provide a form.  So they survive all challenges.  At least so far.

Their advertising portrays them as the hero trying to save the average person’s hard-earned dollars from seemingly greedy lawyers.  And frankly, Joe the plumber is eating it up big time.  Use of these internet-based services is growing.

The problem is that Joe the plumber doesn’t know when the matter requires greater finesse than these forms can provide.  And when an undesirable outcome finally shows up — often years later — it often can’t be fixed, or costs far more to fix than would have been spent originally to do it right.

Here’s the problem.  There’s no way to know in advance if the solution is inadequate, unless an actual lawyer is involved.  Later, when a lawyer must correct, or attempt to correct, the situation, he or she is bound by confidentiality and cannot reveal to the public the consequences of using such services.  So unfortunately John Q Public shares all the success stories with friends and relatives, and enhances the reputation of these services.  Rarely does Joe the plumber hear of the horror stories from others.  And those who ultimately must use a real lawyer to fix problems after the fact rarely talk about it.

So I have challenged lawyers to share some of those stories with me, without any client-identifiable information.  I will in turn publish the information.  Share it with friends, relatives and colleagues who are tempted to meet their legal needs “on the cheap” with an online service provider.

All the stories will be posted under the same title “Why You Need a Real Lawyer” so if you don’t want to subscribe, just return to the blog on occasion and look for that title in the Table of Contents.

Story #2:

Client pays $100 to a legal forms website to develop simple, uncontested, no custody, no asset, divorce documents. Client pays another $200 to file them. The Prothonotary bounces them for formalities. Client goes home, spends more money (another $50) to redo the documents on a different website. This time the Prothonotary accepts the documents, but the Judge bounces them for problems. Client comes to [real lawyer]. I have to move to start over, and charge them the same fee we always charge to clean up the mess! At least the Judge immediately signed the proposed order to start over with filing new documents that actual conform to the rules, and let the client use the filing fee they already paid.

Why You Need a Real Lawyer

There are a number of internet-based “legal service” providers, who provide quick forms for legal needs.  They advertise on television quite a bit.  They provide forms for incorporation, wills and estate plans, and more.  Beware!!  The results can be disastrous.

No doubt you’ve heard or read that Bar Associations in most states have sued most of these providers for the Unauthorized Practice of Law.   Unless you are a lawyer or employed in the legal field, you probably felt they were the underdog. You may have rooted for them to win.  And indeed, they are very careful in interpreting the UPL statute in each state to ensure they do not cross the line.  So they survive all challenges.  At least so far.

Their advertising portrays them as the hero trying to save John Q Public’s hard-earned dollars from greedy lawyers.  And frankly, John is eating it up big time.  Use of these internet-based services is growing.

The problem is that John Q Public doesn’t know when the matter requires greater finesse than these forms can provide.  And when an undesirable outcome finally shows up — often years later — it often can’t be fixed, or costs far more to fix than would have been spent originally to do it right.

Here’s the problem.  There’s no way to know in advance if the solution is inadequate, unless an actual lawyer is involved.  Later, when a lawyer must correct, or attempt to correct, the situation, he or she is bound by confidentiality and cannot reveal to the public the consequences of using such services.  So unfortunately John Q Public shares all the success stories with friends and relatives, and enhances the reputation of these services.  Rarely does John Q Public hear of the horror stories from others.  And those who ultimately must use a real lawyer to fix problems after the fact rarely talk about it.

So I have challenged lawyers to share some of those stories with me, without any client-identifiable information.  I will in turn publish the information.  Share it with friends, relatives and colleagues who are tempted to meet their legal needs “on the cheap” with an online service provider.

All the stories will be posted under the same title “Why You Need a Real Lawyer” so if you don’t want to subscribe, just return to the blog on occasion and look for that title in the Table of Contents.

Story #1:

Client owns a small business as a sole proprietor.  Client’s accountant tells client to incorporate to save money.  Accountant goes to a website to fill out forms and incorporates the client, proclaiming success.  Client is involved with government contracting.  Client tells contract officer he is incorporated.   Contract officer gives client forms to fill out and have certified for compliance with government contracting rules.  Client is in shock when contract officer asks pointed questions about all the other forms the client should have already submitted to various agencies – and why the client’s lawyer (accountant, actually) did not do those things!  Contract officer gives client a month to clean up the mess before they take steps to cancel the contract.  So client comes to [attorney] to — eight months after incorporating — file the notices and fill out the forms that are now nine months late.  Finally, client can certify to contracting officer that the right steps are done, and the government will now renew the contract.

Ransomware (malware) on Cell Phones

 

ransomeWe thought that our cell phones were safe from ransomware, like CryptoLocker, which has been infecting hundreds of thousands of computers in the U.S.  Not so!  A recent article in CNet Daily News reports that there are as many as 5,000 attacks per day.  A mobile threat report from Mobile Lookout Security, which makes security software for smartphones, found 4 million of Lookout’s 60 million users were held hostage last year.  In 2014 they report a 75% increase in mobile threats in the U.S.  You can read about the most prevalent malware at the end of the post, below.

The article tells the story of  a 12-year-old girl from Tennessee who tapped a link on her smartphone to watch a new music video.  Instead of a video, she had unwittingly installed malicious software that downloaded child pornography, locked her Android phone, and threatened to report the pornography to the FBI if she didn’t fork over $500 in ransom.

What should you do to protect yourself?

1)  Never download applications from outside the official Google Play store or Apple App Store.  Be careful clicking on links when online.  “Free” could wind up being very expensive.  Keep that in mind when on social media sites.

2)  Install an application that will block ransomware.  Avast (free for mobile) and Mobile Lookout Security are two big players.  Note item #1 above before downloading software which will allegedly protect you, from an unknown source.

3)  Never pay the ransom, and always report the crime to police.  There is no track record to show that paying ransom will lead to removal of the malware and release of your mobile device. In most cases, you are only providing incentive for thieves to continue to create new and more sophisticated software.

It’s an even more dangerous computing world out there than it was just a year ago.  Be extra careful out there!!

The most prevalent ransomware threats in 2014, according to Mobile Lookout Security:

  1. NotCompatible| Malware

​NotCompatible is a trojan that surreptitiously acts as a network proxy.  It allows attackers to send and receive traffic through a victim’s mobile device onto connected networks for fraudulent purposes.

  1. Koler| Malware

Koler is a trojan disguised as a media app.  It locks a victim’s device, after falsely reporting the discovery of illegal activity.  Koler attempts to coerce victims into paying them to avoid criminal charges and regain control of their device.  The CNet article advises that police can tell that you are not the “guilty party” so don’t be afraid to report.

  1. ScareMeNot| Malware

ScareMeNot is a trojan that pretends to scan victims’ phones for security issues.  It then locks their device, after falsely reporting that its scan found illicit content. It attempts to coerce victims into paying them to avoid criminal charges and regain control of their device.  Again, report this to police.

  1. ColdBrother| Malware

ColdBrother is a trojan that pretends to scan victims’ phones for security issues, but then locks their device after falsely reporting that its scan found illicit content. It can also take a front-facing camera photo and attempts to coerce victims into paying them to avoid criminal charges and regain control of their device.

  1. ScarePakage| Malware

ScarePakage is a trojan that pretends to scan victims’ phones for security issues and then locks their device after falsely reporting that its scan found illicit content. ScarePakage attempts to coerce victims into paying them to avoid criminal charges and regain control of their device.

Notice that each of these Trojans are very similar.  It’s rumored that there is one very talented programmer who is being well paid by various criminal organizations to keep creating variations of the malware, in order to stay ahead of detection software.  Notice that each are “socially engineered” to make you want to run the software voluntarily.  So even if you don’t click on a malicious link out of ignorance, you can still fall victim.

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