Posts tagged: Debt

Caring for Elderly Parents

Many of you read my blog post some time ago entitled “Children Responsible for Parental Debt”.  It’s a serious issue surrounding the long-standing Filial Responsibility Law in PA.  I’m pleased to let you know that the Greater Philadelphia Professional Council, of which I am a member, will be presenting a FREE seminar on this topic.  The seminar, entitled “Caring for Elderly Parents: with Knowledge and Sensitivity”  will be held on Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at the Hilton Garden Inn; 530 West Pennsylvania Ave., in Fort Washington, PA.  Registration runs from 7:45 to 8:30 a.m., with a breakfast and the Panel presentation from 8:30 to 10 a.m..  The faculty will be diverse and cover this topic from many angles.  Among topics included will be

 

  • In-Home vs. Facility-Based Care—understand your options
  • Proper Legal Document Compilation—determine parental wishes
  • Legal Matters—learn about available governmental assistance for the aging
  • Truth vs. Myth—understand the current environment of long term care insurance
  • Family Coping Strategies—recognize physical and psychological impact on family members

Please save the date if you are interested in this FREE seminar.  Feel free to share it with staff, attorneys, or family members who may also benefit.  Actual invites will go out shortly.  If you are interested in getting on the mailing list for this and future seminars, send an email to info@gppcouncil.org .

Children Responsible for Parental Debt

I never heard of the “filial responsibility” laws.  Until I read about a PA resident who must pay for Mom’s $93,000 Nursing Home bill.  Now that I’ve read about it, I’m sure glad my sister has the “deep pocket” in our family.

I thought my first post when I returned from TechShow would be about one of the many wonderful lessons learned.  I was in fact going to post diligently from there.  But the Chicago Hilton has about the worst Wi-Fi access I’ve encountered.  It was tough just getting a cell phone signal.  It was fairly humorous to see so many lawyers with cell phones to their ears and bodies literally plastered to the windows like some sort of human antennae.  At night, when I got back to the room after the myriad of social events, I was just too tired to think, let alone write.

Now that I’m back I’m anxious to share, but an article in the Anderson Elder Law Newsletter entitled “Son Liable for Mom’s $93,000 Nursing Home Bill Under ‘Filial Responsibility’ Law” really caught my attention.  How could that be?  Well, it be!  And I am so shocked by this, I feel compelled to share it right now.  The article explains:

Some 29 states currently have laws making adult children responsible for their parents if their parents can’t afford to take care of themselves. These “filial responsibility” laws have rarely been enforced, but six years ago when federal rules made it more difficult to qualify for Medicaid long-term care coverage, some elder law attorneys predicted that nursing homes would start using the laws as a way to get care paid for.

And it was precisely the application of this law which caused the son to be forced to take financial responsibility.  Unbelievably, the law does not require it to consider other sources of income or to wait until a parent’s Medicaid claim is resolved.  Even more pernicious is that the law permits the nursing home to choose which family members to pursue for the money owed.  In this particular case, they ignored a spouse and other siblings, and went after the apparent ”deep pocket.”

Linda Anderson notes that after Pennsylvania re-enacted its filial support law in the mid-2000s, Williamsport attorney Jeffrey A. Marshall forecast that the new Medicaid law would trigger a wave of lawsuits involving adult children.  Obviously, he was correct, and this is just the beginning of what may become a tidal wave of lawsuits.  In Marshall’s blog post about this court decision he writes:

Children are often surprised to learn that they can be held responsible for their parent’s unpaid medical and care related expenses. It just doesn’t seem fair. But, whether fair or not, the Pittas case shows that the child’s support obligation to the parent is the law in Pennsylvania.  Children: be warned. If your parent needs long term care and may someday be unable to pay for it, you should find out about your potential financial liability and what to do about it.

So what is the son supposed to do, now that he has lost his appeal?  Is he to sue his father and siblings for their “fair share” of the debt?  Declare bankruptcy?  I’m just thinking out loud on this, while I shake my head in disbelief.  Our lives are already so stressful . . . raising children in a two-income household, trying to care for aging parents, trying to save for retirement in an ever-increasing financially hostile future environment, and to have some quality of life and semblance of balance in the current moment.  Is this the straw which breaks the back of American families?

I am so grateful I “strongly encouraged” my mom to purchase optional Long Term Care Insurance through her employer’s Cafeteria Plan some 30 years ago, so that it’s there if she needs it.   We found out from personal experience about 2 years ago how quickly the bills can mount after my mother suffered a fall at home.  The nursing home costs, followed by rehab at home, and then extended personal care until she was recovered enough to be completely on her own again, added up to a huge amount of money which her Medicare and additional excess policy didn’t cover.   They paid plenty, don’t get me wrong.  But there was a lot of uncovered additional expense, especially the personal in-home care, which cost a fortune.  At least the Long Term Care contributed toward some of that once the elimination period was passed.  (Although I admit I had to really duke it out with them to get her benefit paid, despite her making premium payments like clockwork for 30 years.  But hey, don’t even get me started on the topic of insurance companies!  :-(  )

If you have living parents, this is not something you can afford to ignore.  Make sure they have adequate insurance coverage, and talk to an Elder Care attorney just to see what risks you face, and how you might avoid them.  The investment to protect yourself now is a pittance compared to the potential exposure later.

 

Law Firms on the Edge

Loans to law firms used to be a “no brainer” until some spectacular failures created losses in the millions.  Now, law firms are watched and analyzed carefully by banks.  An article entitled “Consultant Has ‘Somewhat Robust’ Watch List of Law Firms in Possible Danger” which was appeared in ABA Journal Law News Now, included a video of an interview of Dan DiPietro, chairman of the Law Firm Group at Citi Private Bank.  I was impressed with the interview, and the fact that Dan uses “real” indicators of whether a law firm is in trouble, rather than just focus on the P&L.  He knows that underbidding jobs, partner defections, and excess capacity are all surer advance indicators that a law firm is heading for the fiscal cliff’s edge.  He rightly recognizes that only later do these trends reflect in the bottom line.

His view is that transactional work is strong in a few industries, but otherwise is mostly still flat, causing financial hardship at large law firms.  And that trend will continue for the foreseeable future.  Although his focus seems to be exclusively with “BigLaw” I can confirm that this trend is affecting mid-size firms as well.  Especially because of increased competitive pressure from larger firms now focusing marketing attention on smaller clients than normal, in an attempt to increase utilization of professional staff. 

I convey these increasing competition principles to attorneys by using a fishing analogy.  Think of the BigLaw firms as the deep sea fishermen.  They’re after the big scores.  But when their favorite locales are overfished, they look for new spots.  Next thing you know, they invade the waters formerly favored exclusively by the mid-size firms. Smaller fish, but still reasonable size and quantity.  They make up for the size difference in fishing for greater volume.  So what do the smaller firms have to do, faced with better-equipped increased competition that outclasses their operations?  They come and fish off the local pier of small-firm.   Firms that never expected competition; firms that always felt that larger firms were not interested in their clients.  They are now facing increased and daunting competition. 

When you know that you are or will shortly face steep competition where there was little or none before, it’s time to bring on your A-game.  Excellent service — defined from the perspective of the client, not the law firm — will be the number one determining factor of who gets or keeps the client.   Cost management and innovative pricing strategies will be another.  The days of clients rewarding inefficiencies are over.  If you haven’t taken quality-control measures to leverage your firm with knowledge management and workflow innovations, you will be unable to remain competitive.

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